430 Enfield St, Enfield
CT 06082
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(860) 265-7890
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860-879-8999

appt@smileora.net
sunnysmiles@smileora.net

Where Are Meets Science to create Beautiful

Overview


If a tooth has been broken or damaged by decay, your dentist will try to fix it with a filling, crown or other dental treatment. But when there’s too much damage for the tooth to be repaired, the tooth may need to be extracted — or removed — from its socket in the bone.

  • Beyond damage and decay, here are some other common reasons for tooth removal:
  • Some people have extra teeth that block other teeth from coming in.
  • Sometimes baby teeth don’t fall out in time to allow the permanent teeth to come in.
  • People getting braces may need teeth extracted to create room for the teeth that are being moved into place.
  • People receiving radiation to the head and neck may need to have teeth in the field of radiation extracted.
  • People receiving cancer drugs may develop infected teeth because these drugs weaken the immune system. Infected teeth may need to be extracted.

Wisdom teeth, also called third molars, are often extracted either before or after they erupt in the mouth. They commonly come in during the late teens or early 20’s. They need to be removed if they are decayed, infected, or if there is not enough room in the mouth

There are two types of extractions:


A simple extraction – this procedure is on a tooth that can be seen in the mouth. For a simple extraction, the dentist loosens the tooth with an instrument called an elevator. Then the dentist uses forceps to remove the tooth.

A surgical extraction – this is a more complex procedure, which is used if a tooth may have broken off at the gum line or has not erupted in the mouth. The oral surgeon will make a small incision into your gum to surgically remove the broken tooth or impacted wisdom tooth.

Tooth extraction is the removal of a tooth from its socket in the bone. If a tooth has been broken or damaged by decay, your dentist will try to fix it with a filling, crown or other treatment. Sometimes, though, there’s too much damage for the tooth to be repaired. In this case, the tooth needs to be extracted. A very loose tooth also will require extraction if it can’t be saved, even with bone replacement surgery (bone graft). Here are other reasons:

  • Some people have extra teeth that block other teeth from coming in.
  • Sometimes baby teeth don’t fall out in time to allow the permanent teeth to come in.
  • People getting braces may need teeth extracted to create room for the teeth that are being moved into place.
  • People receiving radiation to the head and neck may need to have teeth in the field of radiation extracted.
  • People receiving cancer drugs may develop infected teeth because these drugs weaken the immune system. Infected teeth may need to be extracted.
  • Some teeth may need to be extracted if they could become a source of infection after an organ transplant. People with organ transplants have a high risk of infection because they must take drugs that decrease or suppress the immune system.
  • Wisdom teeth, also called third molars, are often extracted either before or after they come in. They commonly come in during the late teens or early 20s. They need to be removed if they are decayed, cause pain or have a cyst or infection. These teeth often get stuck in the jaw (impacted) and do not come in. This can irritate the gum, causing pain and swelling. In this case, the tooth must be removed. If you need all four wisdom teeth removed, they are usually taken out at the same time.

If you expect to have treatment with intravenous drugs called bisphosphonates for a medical condition, be sure to see your dentist first. If any teeth need to be extracted, this should be done before your drug treatment begins. Having a tooth extraction after bisphosphonate treatment increases the risk of osteonecrosis (death of bone) in the jaw. PreparationYour dentist or oral surgeon will take an X-ray of the area to help plan the best way to remove the tooth. Be sure to provide your full medical and dental history and a list of all medicines you take. This should include both prescription and over-the-counter drugs, vitamins and supplements.If you are having wisdom teeth removed, you may have a panoramic X-ray. This X-ray takes a picture of all of your teeth at once. It can show several things that help to guide an extraction:

  • The relationship of your wisdom teeth to your other teeth
  • The upper teeth’s relationship to your sinuses
  • The lower teeth’s relationship to a nerve in the jawbone that gives feeling to your lower jaw, lower teeth, lower lip and chin. This nerve is called the inferior alveolar nerve.
  • Any infections, tumors or bone disease that may be present

Some doctors prescribe antibiotics to be taken before and after surgery. This practice varies by the dentist or oral surgeon. Antibiotics are more likely to be given if:

  • You have infection at the time of surgery
  • You have a weakened immune system
  • You will have a long surgery
  • You have specific medical conditions

Wisdom Teeth Extractions

Wisdom teeth, or third molars, do not always erupt properly when they decide to make an appearance. It’s wise to get an early opinion from your dentist on getting wisdom teeth pulled before they become impacted, causing pain, swelling, infection, cavities or gum disease.

What does “impacted” mean?

When wisdom teeth don’t have room to grow or they haven’t reached their final position by age 25, they are considered impacted-no place to go and no plans to grow. Third molar impaction is the most prevalent medical developmental disorder. A full set of healthy teeth sometimes doesn’t leave much room for wisdom teeth to erupt.

Why don’t wisdom teeth grow in right?

Although we have seen a reduction in the size of the human jaw during the course of human evolution, we still retain the same number of teeth. The change in jaw size of modern humans is related to the discovery and use of fire to prepare food, and the development of crude tools, such as blades, to process food. These advances not only enhanced the culinary skills and diet of early humans, they significantly lightened the workload of the jaw. The result? As the need for a powerful jaw vanished, the jaw became smaller, and the teeth became crowded, the space required for the proper growth of wisdom teeth, no longer available. (The modern, human mouth is too small to accommodate wisdom teeth, which make their appearance in young adults between the ages of 15-25.)

What kind of problems can impacted third molars cause?

Partially erupted wisdom teeth are breeding grounds for bacteria and germs and may lead to infection. In addition to jaw pain and gum disease, which may also develop, impacted third molars are ripe sites for the growth of tumors and cysts. Not all wisdom teeth cause problems, however.

Can’t I just use an antibiotic?

Antibiotics only soothe infected wisdom teeth for a short time. Since people frequently use a wide variety of antibiotics, the infection may be resistant to such medication and doesn’t solve the real problem: The tooth can’t fit in your mouth.

When is removal necessary?

It isn’t wise to wait until wisdom teeth bother you. Early removal, as advised by your dentist, is generally recommended to avoid problems, such as an impacted tooth that destroys the second molar. People younger than 16 heal easier too. At an early age, people should be evaluated by their dentist who can track third molar development with the help of X-rays. Second molars should be visible to lessen the chance of damaging them during surgery. This occurs at age 11 or 12, so wisdom teeth should be removed when the decision has been made that they cannot erupt into an acceptable position.

What if I don’t have any symptoms?

People with symptoms of impaction, such as pain, swelling and infection should have their wisdom teeth removed immediately. However, those with no symptoms can avoid the chance of ever suffering from the pain of impacted wisdom teeth or achieve better orthodontic treatment results by having them removed. A symptomatic impacted wisdom teeth also should be removed to reduce the chance of unexplained pain, accommodate prosthetic appliances, or avoid cavities, periodontal disease, bone shrinkage and tumor development.

How is the tooth removed?

Surgery for impacted wisdom teeth consists of removing of the gum tissue over the tooth, gently stripping connective tissue away from the tooth and bone, removing the tooth and sewing the gum back up.

Where Art meets Science to create Beautiful Smiles
Quality Dental Care at an Affordable price

430 Enfield St, Enfield, CT 06082

 

(860) 265-7890

 

206-426-1039

 

dentalcare@smileora.net

 

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Monday                                         9 am-6 pm(alternate)

Tuesday                                         9 am-6 pm

Wednesday                                   9 am-6 pm

Thursday                                        9 am-6 pm

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Saturday                                    8 am-2 pm(alternate)